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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)
the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however,
. tonight, jim's got two exclusives. the ceos of nps pharma and exact sciences just ahead. >>> and later, king of the hill. they're the two top performers in the dow last year. but 2013 isn't big enough for both of them. with the big mortgage settlement behind them, could bank of america deposit returns for you this year, or should the housing rebound keep home depot in your sights? cramer decides. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail at jimcramercnbc.com or call 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on ev
important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted
, visit >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands,
in answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we ca
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
describes what she saw in her first period science class this morning when she says a classmate walked in with a shotgun and started shooting. >> didn't like he was aiming for anybody for certain at the time. but we looked back and the kid made a joke that got shot, he said, dude, i got shot. we thought it was just something fake. >> reporter: she says at first she thought it was a joke or possibly a drill. then she says she saw blood on the classmate's shoulder. >> he was kind of bloody. and everyone ran to the back of the classroom except for a few of us. we stayed at our desks. >> reporter: aldridge said the gunman came in intending to shoot one specific student. >> the kid was saying i'm only looking for this person, just one person. and that kid kind of popped his head up behind where he was hiding and said i'm sorry. and then he kept saying i'm sorry. >> reporter: she said the teacher then convinced the boy to lower the weapon and the security guard arrived and he was taken into custody. >> he was one of those kids like awkward a little nerdy
medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affirmation -- you cannot put a price on a. >> he will be honored at the white house in a ceremony later this year. dr. gates received his degrees and ph.d. from mit. he has done postgraduate work at harvard and caltech. tim tooten, wbal tv-11 news. >> coming up, another staff choice on capitol hill. >> president obama's nomination for treasury secretary. >> different, emotional approaches to saturday's showdown. later in s
that rejects maybe what might fit on a bumper sticker but is at least based in science. >> jennifer: so are you arguing that the smart initiatives that you are talking about are based in brain science or is it more in an economic pragmatic -- do you have more an economic or pragmatic take on it? >> i think it's both. i think we learned so much about marijuana today than the last 30 years. it's sort of ironic we have also seen the descendants of legalization. today's marijuana is not the marijuana of the wood stock days. it's five to seven times more potent. it also had less of other ingredients like cbd which actually don't make you high and what that does to the adolescent brain is startling. heavy persistent use leads to significant iq loss among young people. the british medical journal showed that marijuana intoxication doubles your car crash risk. so we just want to get the public health message out there for the american people to know about, since the only discussion seems to be bombarded with legalization and a promise of revenue, and getting rid of the
to go to on the far side of the unknown that can do the robotic science, can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen, which is fuel. a conference recently in hawaii, i was following a workshop that has been setting up international lunar bases by practicing on the big island of hawaii. you will assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down or you expected to land, another one down some distance away -- how do you put them together? do that through a satellite -- motion control. you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why my so enthusiastic about that? that is exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the noon of mars who can then assemble a base that we will then send people. we should assure ourselves that we protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere. that is the moon, too. >> a two-part question -- do you believe in extraterrestrial life? >> i hope so. >> are we presumptuous enough to think we are the on
and reduce those overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be th
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
to us for the truth. they come to us for science. >> they say, we need someone to tell us what this product tastes like. and how it smells and what it looks like and what its texture is. but we get very consistent, almost machine-like terms. >> the food that comes into the lab mirrors what americans are buying or eating. remember the '90s, when everything had to be fat-free. that trend gave way to products that are organic and all-natural. now, the food tasters are encountering food that's free of sodium and gluten-free. >> looking at the formula, puts it on the shelf. it really doesn't happen that way. the food companies are working on something all the time to make sure it's the most competitive product out there. >> reporter: professional taste testers are hired for not only their acute taste and smell. but ability to verbalize what they observe. >> things they might not notice, they can key in on. >> reporter: the next time you give thanks at a meal, thanks these ladies, as well. they're doing this. so you don't have to. in livermore, nbc bay area news. >> that answered one
and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans
questions. that's what we do. journalism isn't a perfect science. to suggest that the shootings didn't happen, that 20 children weren't killed and that they aren't suffering and still suffering, tracy is not the only one spinning conspiracy theories on youtube and online. this is from a website i don't want to use. some are claiming that 6-year-old emilie parker killed in sandy hook didn't actually die. now, as proof, they point to a dress she was wearing in a family photo before the shooting. it's the same dress that emily's little sister wore when president obama met with victim's families. so the people online, these conspiracy theorists are saying that is actually emily on president obama's lap. it is a sickening claim. there is no other word for it. there is another one on another website that they use an interview that noah posner's mother did on this program to make its point. here is some of the interview. watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? >> most of the time, i'm kind of numb. i think about -- i think every mama out there can relate to t
's what we do. journalism is not a perfect science, but to suggest it means that the shootings didn't happen and the children were not kill and the families didn't and are not still suffering is beyond comprehension and deeply offensive to many. as we said, tracy is not the only one spinning experience theories on you tube and online. i don't want to give them traffic so i won't use their names, but they claim emilie parker killed in sandy hook didn't actual lie die. they point to address the dress she was wearing before the shooting is the same dress that emily's sister wore when president obama met with victims's families. so the people online, these experience theorists are saying that's actually emilie on president obama's lap. it's a sickening claim. another on another website that i won't name either, they use an interview that noah posner's mother did to make its point. here's the interview before i tell you the theory, watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? >> most of the time i'm kind of numb. i think about -- i think every mom out there can
the star wars inspired weapon. but on a posting the science and space advisor wrote the u.s. does not support blowing up planets. he also calls with a waste of taxpayer money. >> #* >> your new miss america is miss new york! [applause] >> mallory hagan won the pageant last night. the panelingen was in vegas. she tap danced to win the prize. she will be supporting stopping child abuse. the first autistic miss american contestant also made history. online voters chose miss montana as a semifinalist, based on her contestant video. >> i thank you so much america for voting for me. i'm that much closer to becoming miss america. thank you so much. >> the winner who took home the crown, mallory hagan, receives a $50,000 college scholarship. miss south carolina, by the way, was the first runner-up. >>> tomorrow on abc7 good morning america, robin roberts has a big announcement sure to make you smile. good morning america begins tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. here on abc7. >> the golden globes are tonight. the awards have historically been a good indicator for the oscars. but there's a growing cont
performance and that science magazine named you one of the best pharmaceutical companies in the world. >> we are lucky. my partner since we opened the labs nearly 25 years ago, actually we started the company. today is our birthday. 25 years ago today we actually signed the first papers that started the company. but when we opened the labs in 1989, my partner, we believed that the key to the business was to do good science and then get individual scientists and treat them well and let them run and they would get across the finish line like they have. i thought the sales were amazing. did they expect more because one of your competitors was caught up in a pharmacy compounding problem? is that what people expected because of the problem with your competitor? >> yeah, it is hard to know what drives people exactly expect and why they expect it. but there was a problem with compounding pharmacies. people had fungal meningitis and died. but that put a question mark around a lot of drugs and people thought that the market leader actually, this drug avacin which is used off label but made by compoun
alameda creek filter gallery project, with environmental science associates to provide environmental analysis services and permitting support; and authorize the general manager to execute this amendment with a time extension of six years, for a total agreement of duration of eight years, 10 months. >> [speaker not understood]. good afternoon, commissioners. tm kelly. this project, the alameda creek, per alameda creek filter gallery project is located in [speaker not understood] on alameda creek. it is to recapture water that is released for fisheries, habitat enhancement from the calaveras dam. the project started in january 2010, then it was placed on hold for -- since november 2011, basically two years. and now we are ready, almost ready. the planning has been going on to plan the project and we're almost ready to start environmental review again, but we don't have enough time. so, therefore, we're asking for a three-year, five-month extension. there was a slight error in the agenda item under amendment number 1. if you look at that, it says extension by sick years. >> yes. >> but
the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and
than it appears, it's not rocket science? >> and not only maybe not rocket science but ends up being good. in texas, 6% unemployment and that is attributed to the energy boom. they allowed it to happen. on the federal level we are not allowing it to take place. in iowa they have a surplus and the fours they have an unemployment rate. so you can make people's lives better. it makes sense to people in a common sense level but in the federal area not so much. >> neil: i get a lot of e-mail. we had ron johnson on and got heated on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a surplus beca
-producing town west of bakersfield. the 16-year-old gunman walked into his science class and began firing with a 12 gauge shotgun. he didn't say a word. he fired at a second student but missed before the teacher was able to talk him down. >> we were all together in the room. everyone was helping each other. everybody was afraid that everyone was there for each other. >> police say the two victims were target the because the shooter says he had been pulleyed by them. >>> new this morning a car wash fundraiser is planned for 9:00 in san jose to help a family who loft three members in an apartment fire. the december 29th fire killed go family members. the proceeds raised to the will help pay for the funeral costs. >>> a series of violent attacks on women in san francisco is prompting new warnings about using your cell phone in public. it's a growing problem. last year half of all robberies involved stealing an electronic device. we have the story. >>> this woman walking along polk street was texting and not looking up. it's in attention like this that san francisco police says makes people v
on the obama administration to build the star wars weapon. but on a posting the science and space advisor wrote the u.s. does not support blowing up planets. he also added why waste taxpayer money on a death star with the fundamental flaw that can be exploited by a one-man star ship? >>> there are questions about -- the new miss america 2013. >> your new miss america is miss new york! [applause] >> mallory hagen won the pageant last night. she tap danced to win the price. again the prize. she will be supporting stopping child abuse. the first autistic miss american contestant also made history. online voters chose miss montana as a semifinalist, based on her contestant video. >> i thank you so much america for voting for me. i'm that much closer to becoming miss america. thank you so much. >> alexis may have won the popular vote, but the overall winner, mallory hagan, receives a $50,000 college scholarship. miss south carolina, by the way, was the first runner-up. >>> tomorrow on abc7 good morning america, robin roberts has a big announcement sure to make you smile. good morning america against
asked questions. that's what we do. journalism isn't a perfect science of course, but to suggest it somehow means the shooting didn't happen, that 20 schirn weren't killed, that families didn't suffer and weren't still suffering is beyond comprehension and deeply offensive to many. tracy isn't the only one spinning conspiracy theories. on youtube and online this is a website i don't want to mention because i don't want to give them extra traffic. some of them are claiming 6-year-old emilie parker didn't die. they're pointing to a dress she was wearing in a shooting. it's the same dress that emily's little sister wore when president obama met with families. these conspiracy theorists are saying that's actually emily on president obama's lap. it's a sick ening claim, obviously, there's no other word for t. there's another one on another website. they use an interview that noah pozner's mother did. here's some of that interview. watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? i mean -- >> most of the time i'm -- i'm kind of numb, you know? i think about -- an
in the real world but the science has been modeled and looks like it would actually work. the trick is getting the salt particles to the very particular size and very large quantity that would be necessary to do this on a scale that actually matters. >> so how close are we to that actually happening? i mean seems like it's out of a science fiction movie. >> it does and i should be very clear that the people that are working on in in silicon valley, they have no intention of actually taking these machines out to ocean beach and starting to test it on their own. they are just focused on working in the lab, developing the technology that they think will be capable of doing it and they think they are pretty close. they would then turn it over to academic or government researchers to decide what to do. >> and that brings us into the area where you have -- if you have this technology, if it goes to academic or federal researchers, you need federal or academic money to back this and that will bring a debate in, won't it? because there's some concern about should you be coming up with measures that de
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)

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